The
Renaissance
Society

at The University of Chicago
PLEASE NOTE: THIS IS AN ARCHIVE SITE
Visit our new site for all current information.
 

Rebecca Warren

October 03 – December 12, 2010

 
 
Sun, Oct 3, 20104:00 pm

Opening Reception


Location: The Renaissance Society
Admission: free
 
Sat, Nov 6, 20102:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Concert

Sculpture with Solo Tuba Accompaniment
Marc Unternaehrer (tuba)

Location: The Renaissance Society
Admission: free
 
Classically trained Swiss tuba player Marc Unternaehrer has performed in a range of contexts throughout Europe and the United States. Certainly no stranger to Chicago, Unternaehrer has performed at The Society in a number of different configurations including the Chicago-Luzern Exchange and as part of Ensemble Noamnesia. In each instance, he was a stand-out, not only by virtue of his chops, but because he has an uncanny knack for finding the precise frequency at which the windows rattle. Set amongst Warren's sculptures, this solo improvised set will be a sight to behold.

This concert will take place in the gallery. FREE
 
Sun, Nov 14, 20102:00 pm

Reading

Poetry Reading by Joanna Fuhrman and Suzanne Buffam

Location: Swift Hall room 106, University of Chicago
Admission: free
 
Joanna Fuhrman is currently teaching in the creative writing program at Rutgers. Fuhrman is the author of four volumes: Pageant (Alice James Books, 2009), Moraine (Hanging Loose Press, 2006), Ugh Ugh Ocean (Hanging Loose Press, 2003) and Freud in Brooklyn (Hanging Loose Press, 2000). "Fuhrman is a leader in the particular, in 'infra-surrealism.' She taboos nothing; no form impedes her complete wit. This full poetry is not only 'feminine, marvelous, and tough,' but subtle, searching, and wounded-sexual, social, and smart. Fuhrman celebrates new truth-telling, an art of the spectacular pageant." David Shapiro

Suzanne Buffam is currently teaching in the creative writing program at The University of Chicago, Buffam's first collection of poetry, Past Imperfect (House of Anansi, 2005), won the Gerald Lampert Award for the best first book of poetry published in Canada in 2005, and was named one of 2005's Books of the Year by the Globe and Mail. Her most recent collection is The Irrationalist, (Canarium Books, 2010). "Buffam's often deadpan tone is like a magical dustpan that sweeps up the strangest observations and ideas, all worlds to themselves. Her 'Little Commentaries'-'On Pi?atas,' 'On Fountains,' and 'On Vanishing Acts' (to name only a few)-are absolute gems, kin to Anne Carson's town poems and Yoko Ono's Grapefruit. Buffam's poems tug at new corners of the brain. They're marvelous." Matthea Harvey
 
Sun, Nov 21, 20102:00 pm

Reading

Poetry Reading by Kim Rosenfield and Karen Weiser

Location: Swift Hall room 106, University of Chicago
Admission: free
 
Kim Rosenfield is a poet and psychotherapist. Rosenfield is the author of three books of genre/ blurring language; Good Morning-Midnight- (Roof Books 2001), which won Small Press Traffic's Book of the Year award in 2002, Tr?ma (Krupskaya 2004), and re: evolution (Les Figues Press 2008). "Rosenfield's part collage, part suede and suave therapeutic technique creates a "voice" that wavers, furtive yet spikily resonant in the amplified tick of the second hand, as the carnal "self" is further contaminated by the freezer-burn of a world run by patents, portents, and hawkish impatience, yet begs to extend its lease with the mirror stage. Read this book for its honey and ash, and sleep easier." Brian Kim Stefans

To Light Out (Ugly Duckling Presse, 2010) is Weiser's first full-length collection. "The poems in To Light Out enact a kind of mystical belief-call it a faith-that language is the means by which we conjure the self and its relationship with others. In Weiser's hands, poems are language illuminated by grace, and the world, in light of such sudden sight, becomes 'The distance into versions of itself / whose miles begin to resemble pale maps / old photographs with studied shadow / inside each female self / composed like a nineteenth century diorama / all heft and movement of hands.' The meditative variation at play in this ambitious collection shines forth brilliantly, at any hour of the day or night." Susan Howe

This event is funded in part by Poets and Writers, Inc.
 
Sun, Dec 5, 20102:00 pm

Reading

Author Alissa Nutting

Location: Swift Hall Room 106, University of Chicago
Admission: free
 
Nutting's writing has appeared in Tin House, Fence, BOMB, and the fairy tale anthology My Mother She Killed Me, My Father He Ate Me. Her short story collection, Unclean Jobs for Women and Girls, was selected by Ben Marcus as winner of the 6th Starcherone Prize. "Alissa Nutting's stunning debut collection, Unclean Jobs for Women and Girls, reanimates the deadest of dead pans to a state of enameled kabuki solar veneer - a sanctified, sublime, full-throated and full-throttled static panic. These fictions are panoplies of syntactic semantic seismic wonders. Don't look now but you are looking at a sun raised to a higher power, and it's not blinking." Michael Martone
 
Sun, Dec 12, 20102:00 pm

Reading

Author and Poet Bhanu Kapil

Location: Swift Hall Room 106, University of Chicago
Admission: free
 
Kapil lives in Colorado where she teaches writing at Naropa University's Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics, as well as Goddard College in Vermont. She has written three full-length works of poetry/prose: The Vertical Interrogation of Strangers (Kelsey Street Press, 2001), Incubation: a space for monsters (Leon Works, 2006), and humanimal [a project for future children] (Kelsey Street Press, 2009). "Wet, wet, green, green. I mix with them and prosper. A baby! Sticky then my mumma licks me clean. Best is brown next to yellow. Best is blue, then brown. Best yellow. Where will the sun go when it's finished?, I ask my mother. Through her skin. So red she is. The sun goes into the ground." From hum animal
 

   
   
The Renaissance Society
is a contemporary art
museum free and
open to the public
Wed  May 18, 2022