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Gustaf Dalstrom

Watercolors and Drawings
November 29 – December 19, 1942

 

The Renaissance Society of the University of Chicago announces two exhibitions: Memorial exhibition of Paintings by Roff Beman, Watercolors and Drawings by Gustaf Dalstrom, Period of exhibition: Sunday November 29 to December 19. There will be a tea for members and friends at 3:30 P.M. on the opening Sunday. Open daily, except Sunday, 2 to 5 P.M. Saturdays, 9 A.M. to 12 noon. (Please note this change in time.) The exhibit may be seen at other hours, weekdays, by courtesy of the Department of Art.

GUSTAF DALSROM, printer, etcher, muralist. Born in the ancient city of Visby on the island of Gottland, in Sweden, he came to America when a small boy. Early years were divided between Chicago and the wooded regions near Manistee, Michigan, where his uncle was a lumberman.

He studied at the Art Institute of Chicago under George Bellows and Randall Davy, married Frances Foy, noted Chicago artist, then a fellow student, and together they did not much pioneer work in the progressive art movements here in Chicago. He traveled extensively in Europe, working continuously in Sweden, Paris, Italy and the south of France.

He has won four important Treasury awards for murals, the last, recently completed, won in the national competition, and one of the largest ever awarded under these auspices hangs in the new post office of St. Joseph, Missouri. He has also done outstanding work in etching and was awarded an annual $500.00 prize for a private edition to members of the Chicago Society of Etcherd. For oil painting, he received the Gold Medal of the Chicago Society of Artists.

Represented in the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art, as well as numerous private collections, and his work has been widely circulated among American Museums and in Sweden.

The watercolors and drawings in the present exhibit in the Renaissance galleries, done for the most part for his own pleasure and study, give the visitor an understanding of the background of his larger works, as well as his deep feeling for landscape, nature, rural life and the more intimate aspects of the city.

Author: unknown
   
   
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Tue  Jun 28, 2022